Collaboration

A major goal of the Washington University (WU) ICTS is to promote and facilitate collaborative research across disciplines.  To evaluate success toward meeting this objective, the ICTS Tracking & Evaluation (T&E) team measured collaboration at three interconnected phases: 1) grant development and submission; 2) active scientific collaboration; and 3) scientific publication.  Publication data obtained for Elsevier SciVal Scopus (types of publications included articles, conference papers, reviews and short surveys) were used to examine publication and co-authorship collaboration patterns for ICTS members from 2007 to 2010.  Over the four year time period:

  • 24.1% of publications had multiple ICTS members (increase from 15.6% in 2007 to 28.6% in 2010)
  • 16.5% of publications had ICTS members representing more than one discipline (increase from 10.1% in 2007 to 19.0% in 2010)

During the first four years of CTSA funding, a general trend towards greater publication collaboration and interdisciplinary co-authorship teams was noted.  ICTS members became more likely to collaborate with other ICTS members, and with other CTSA members.  These collaborations have also become more interdisciplinary, both in terms of grant and journal co-authorship teams.  Consistent results indicate that the ICTS aim of providing infrastructure for interdisciplinary research to facilitate interdisciplinary co-authorship collaboration is being fulfilled.  The T&E team expects to conduct a similar analysis after YR8 of funding.

For more information on ICTS co-authorship collaboration patterns, see:

Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Changes in Interdisciplinary Collaboration during a Clinical and Translational Science Award (http:digitalcommons.wustl.edu/becker_pubs/25/)

Global Collaborations
Co-author affiliations for publications authored by ICTS members in 2015 included every US state and countries such as Senegal, Uruguay, Cuba, New Zealand, Portugal, Iceland, Malawi, Chile, Egypt, Thailand, among others.